Faq

What is abortion?

An abortion is the medical procedure of terminating a pregnancy. An abortion is also known as ‘disruption’ or ‘termination of pregnancy’. At CMA we offer two types of abortion care: drug abortion (abortion pills) and surgical abortion. Both procedures are very safe and 1 in 3 women will have one.

Drug abortion involves taking two types of medications at different times, to terminate a pregnancy. The first medicine, mifepristone, stops pregnancy growth by blocking the hormone progesterone and causes pregnancy to separate from the wall of the uterus.

The second medicine, misoprostol, causes softening and opening of the cervix (neck) and contractions of the uterus so that pregnancy passes through the vagina. You will experience colic pain and bleeding similar to a miscarriage. The second medicine is taken at home or it may be in oka’s own clinic if you prefer. At some of our centers, you may be given the second medication to take at home, depending on whether you are eligible. Not all of our centers and clinics currently provide this service. We will explain the options available on your appointment.

In CMA, medication abortion is available up to 9 weeks + 6 days pregnant

Read our pharmacological abortion page where the procedure is explained in a little more detail.

Surgical abortion involves pregnancy being removed through the vagina by an experienced doctor, using a suction method. After 14 weeks + 6 days of pregnancy, medications for cervical preparation and thin specialized instruments will also be used. Your pregnancy (how many weeks of pregnancy you have) and your medical history will determine the surgical abortion procedure you will be offered.

In CMA, surgical abortion is available up to 23 weeks + 6 days pregnant.

Read our surgical abortion page where the procedure is explained in a little more detail.

If you are pregnant and would like to discuss your options, call us anytime at 93 452 99 30 (open 24 hours).

What is medication abortion?

Medication abortion (or the abortion pill, as it is sometimes called) involves taking two types of medications at different times, to terminate a pregnancy.

The first, mifepristone, stops pregnancy growth by blocking the hormone progesterone and causes pregnancy to separate from the wall of the uterus. The second medicine, misoprostol, causes softening and opening of the cervix (neck of the uterus) and contractions of the uterus so that pregnancy passes through the vagina. You will experience cramps and bleeding, for which we can relieve your pain.

The first medicine, mifepristone, is swallowed with water in the clinic.

The second medicine is taken at the clinic. At some of our centers, you may be given the second medication to take at home, depending on whether you are eligible. Not all of our centers and clinics currently provide this service.

In CMA, medication abortion is available up to 9 weeks + 6 days of pregnancy.

Read about medical abortion in more detail.

What is surgical abortion?

A surgical abortion involves an experienced doctor removing the pregnancy through the vagina using a procedure called vacuum aspiration (a suction method) or dilation and evacuation (D&E).

The procedure for a surgical abortion is different in different gestations (how many weeks you have been pregnant). We may offer the procedure with or without anesthesia, and your choice will be discussed during your consultation.

The instruments used can be plastic or metal with rounded edges. You may be given antibiotics to lower your risk of infection.

In CMA, surgical abortion is available up to 22 weeks + 6 days pregnant.

Read our surgical abortion page for more details on the procedure.

I’m bleeding after my medication abortion, what should I do?

It is perfectly normal to bleed after having had a medical abortion. Each person is different and will experience different amounts of bleeding throughout the abortion process.

You may experience heavy bleeding for a few hours, and during this time pregnancy tissue and blood clots ranging in size from small (the size of a one-pound coin) to quite large (the size of a lemon) would be expected to pass. Many of our clients find it easier to have a private bathroom nearby; Pregnancy is often spent in the bathroom between 4 and 5 hours after taking the second set of medications.

Once the pregnancy has passed, your bleeding will usually decrease and more like an abundant period. It can continue to be quite abundant for a day or two, as the uterus needs to contract and return to its normal size.

It is very important to use compresses and not tampons or menstrual cups to prevent infections and track your bleeding. It is normal to have some bleeding or staining up to 4 weeks after your medication abortion. This bleeding can be unpredictable, irregular, or prolonged. Do not take aspirin during this time as it may increase your bleeding.

If you ever feel concerned, you can call our post-934529930 care nurses at any time; the lines are open 24 hours a day.

Learn more about medication abortion.

I’ve had unprotected sex, am I pregnant?

If you have had sex without using contraceptives, or your contraception has failed, you may be at risk of becoming pregnant. You may become pregnant at any time during your monthly cycle and, although very unlikely, you may even become pregnant when you are in your period. That’s why it’s important to have a regular birth control method: this reduces the risk of an unplanned pregnancy. Condom use also reduces the chances of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

If you are pregnant and not sure what to do next, we can talk to you about your options.

Read more about the different types of contraception.

What is vasectomy?

Vasectomy is the common name for male sterilization. It is a minor outpatient procedure that lasts about 15 minutes and seals the tube (deferential duct) that carries sperm. This will prevent sperm from entering your semen, which is the fluid ejaculated during sex.

Without sperm in semen, a woman’s egg cannot be fertilized and cannot become pregnant.

Read our vasectomy page for more details on the procedure.

Does vasectomy work right away?

No, after your procedure there will be sperm in the tubes, so you should use another method of contraception until we have confirmed the success of your vasectomy in writing.

We will discuss your semen 12 weeks after the procedure. Once you have given your sample, we will write to inform you that your vasectomy has been successful and that you may stop using contraceptives. In some cases this may take several tests.

Please note that if you had a vasectomy before November 21, 2019, you will need to follow the process of providing two samples at 16 and 18 weeks after your procedure.

Learn more about semen testing.

Which abortion method is right for me?

The type of procedure you may be offered will depend on some personal factors. Your gestation (how many weeks of pregnancy you have), your medical history, gynecological history, medications, and your personal choice will help determine which method is best for you.

If you would like to discuss your options, you can talk to your family doctor or call us anytime at 93 452 99 30 (open 24 hours) for a confidential conversation.

Are abortions safe?

Abortion is very safe when performed in a clinic authorized by the Department of Health, with specialists performing an approved treatment, such as in CMA.

The World Health Organization says the risk of death from safe abortion is lower than death caused by an injection of penicillin or for continuing with pregnancy*.

Like any surgical procedure or medical treatment, abortion carries some risks, and we will explain them clearly during your consultation with us.

* World Health Organization (2012), Safe abortion: technical and political guidance for health systems (second edition), p.49. Available in: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/70914/1/9789241548434_eng.pdf

How fast can I have an abortion?

If you have decided that abortion is the best option for you, we recommend that you call us as soon as possible. We’ll usually be able to see you within a week of booking your appointment, but waiting times can fluctuate depending on the time of year.

Treatment must be booked in advance, as unfortunately we do not offer appointments without an appointment.

You can call us 93 452 99 30 (lines are open 24 hours a day) to schedule your abortion care appointment.

How much does abortion cost?

Up to 60% of our patients in Spain will have a social security-funded abortion, which means they pay nothing. If you are not eligible for this social security benefit, we also provide private abortion treatment.

Read a list of our rates here

Can I travel from abroad to have an abortion in CMA?

If you live in a country where abortion is restricted, you can travel to a CMA center or clinic in Spain for an abortion.

We can give you advice on your pregnancy options over the phone or in person. However, we recommend that you contact us before you travel so that we can:

  • Answer any questions you have about treatment options, pricing, travel and accommodation.
  • Arrange for advice by phone, in person, or to provide you with the address of local counseling services.
  • Arrange for you to discuss your treatment options with an experienced nurse.

Call us at any time at one of the following numbers: we are at your disposal 24 hours a day:

  • Callers from France: +331873446769
  • Callers from Italy: +349345229930
  • Callers from outside Spain: +349345229930

If you travel from abroad to one of our centers, we will have to book same-day consultations and treatment appointments (subject to the availability of our appointment and your medical history). We will give you complete information about what to expect after your abortion and how to manage any symptoms you may experience. We recommend that you do not travel long distances home on the same day of treatment, and we recommend that you try to spend the night locally with friends or family if possible.

Read‘How should I prepare for an abortion?’ For more information on what to do before and after your treatment.

The cost of an abortion with us may vary depending on where you travel from; see our rates page for more information.

How should I prepare for my abortion?

Once you have chosen your treatment option, there are a few things you should do to prepare for your appointment:

  1. Travel Arrangements

It is important to arrange your return trip before you come to your appointment.

Do not use public transportation after your abortion treatment, and do not drive home if you had a medical abortion treatment, or a surgical abortion with sedation or general anesthesia.

We strongly recommend that someone travel home with you after treatment and stay with you for the next 24 hours.

If you are travelling from abroad, we advise you to stay overnight locally. See the question Can I travel from abroad to have an abortion at CMA?” for more information.

  1. Bring a companionñbring a companion with you

We recommend that all clients bring a friend or family member with them to their treatment. They will be able to stay with you in the waiting room, but not during your consultation or treatment. Our nurses and health care assistants will be there to help you at all times.

  1. Clothing and accessories.

It is best to wear something loose and comfortable to your appointment. Bring a sweater in case you feel cold. For the surgical abortion, you may find it more comfortable to wear a loose-fitting t-shirt, as you will be asked to remove your pants. You will be given a wrap to cover you before entering the treatment room.

If you are having a surgical abortion, we also ask that you do not wear:

  • nail polish, gel nails or shellac on your nails
  • fake (acrylic nails)
  • tongue piercings

This is because it may interfere with some anesthetic equipment.

  1. Essential things to bring

When you go to your treatment appointment, bring it with you:

  • Any medications you are currently taking (including inhalers).
  • Any information you have from your doctor about any medical conditions
  • Your referral letter from your doctor or family planning clinic if you have one.
  • Any notes you may have received from a previous visit.
  • An extra pair of underwear
  • Sanitary pads suitable for a heavy flow (not tampons or menstrual cups).
  • Your glasses and contact lens kit if you wear contact lenses. You may be asked to remove your contacts prior to the procedure.
  • Your method of payment if you have private (non-NHS) services.
  1. BaVisit

For your comfort, we recommend that you shower or bathe before you leave your home on the day of your appointment. You should not shower for 48 hours after your surgical or medical abortion, as this may increase the risk of infection. Since you may feel dizzy after your abortion, for your safety, do not shower without someone there.

  1. Drug and alcohol use.

Whether you have a surgical or medical abortion, do not use recreational drugs or drink for 24 hours before your appointment. This is because it could affect your treatment and cause your appointment to be moved to another day. Also avoid drinking alcohol for 48 hours after your treatment. If you have used any of these and have any concerns, please inform our staff.

  1. Eating and drinking

If you are having a surgical abortion with general anesthesia or sedation, it is very important that your stomach is empty before the procedure. Be sure to stop eating six hours before your treatment. If you are having a morning procedure, that means no food after 2 am the night before. If your procedure is in the afternoon, you can have a light breakfast (for example, toast or a bowl of cereal) six hours before your procedure. But avoid heavy meals, as they may not have passed through your stomach in time for your appointment. You may chew gum and suck on boiled sweets until you are called for your procedure.

Be sure to stop drinking two hours before your procedure. Anything you drink before your procedure should be a clear liquid, such as water or apple juice. Do not drink milk or anything milk-based, such as tea or coffee.

If you have any questions about these guidelines, call us at 93 452 99 30.

You will be able to eat and drink normally after your treatment.

  1. Arranging child careñ

To be as sensitive as possible to others who may be in the waiting areas, please do not bring children to your appointment. We do not have facilities for children at our centres, so please arrange childcare if possible.

  1. If you areá breastfeeding

Small traces of some of the medications taken as part of your medical or surgical abortion may pass into your breast milk. In most cases, it is okay to continue breastfeeding after the abortion medication or after recovering from any anesthetic. Call us on 93 452 99 30 if you are breastfeeding and would like further help and advice.

Find out more about medical abortion.

Find out about surgical abortion.

Do I need to talk about abortion with my GP?

If you prefer to talk to your family doctor, they can talk to you about your options and refer you to abortion care services. However, you do not have to discuss it with your family doctor if you do not wish, and we are also not obliged to inform you about your appointment.

It is entirely your decision if you want your FAMILY doctor to be notified. You can self-refred for an appointment by calling our counseling line at 93 452 99 30 (open 24 hours).

How will I feel after my abortion?

Each person is different and may feel a variety of emotions around their decision to terminate a pregnancy. If you need to talk about your feelings at any time after your abortion, we can make a counseling appointment for you. Call our 24-hour counseling line at 93 452 99 30 to tell us about this.

Can I get abortion counseling?

While most women are very confident in their decision to have an abortion, others may be undecided. If you don’t feel safe or need to talk more about your situation, we can arrange a counseling appointment for you.

Counseling is a conversation therapy that will help you analyze your feelings and situation in a confidential and safe environment. CMA counselors are highly trained and qualified to help you explore and manage your thoughts, feelings, and problems. They offer attentive and prejudice-free care.

Counseling is optional as part of our abortion care for most clients, and all social security patients are entitled to free counseling sessions before or at any time after treatment. If you are under the age of 16, you should talk to a counselor about your decision.

If you wish, you can also pay for independent counseling. Check our rates.

Counseling appointments are available by phone or in person. If you need to speak, you can call us 93 452 99 30 at any time to make an appointment.

Learn more about counseling

Can a friend or partner come to me on my date?

We strongly recommend that you bring a friend or family member, especially if you are having a surgical abortion with anesthesia.

Your companion may sit with you in the waiting rooms, but unfortunately you will not be able to enter the areas of medical evaluation, consultation, treatment or recovery with you. Our nurses and health care assistants will be with you every step of the way.

If you are under the age of 16, you will need an adult (someone over the age of 18) to accompany you home after your treatment.

How confidential are CMA’s abortion services?

We are committed to protecting your privacy. If you would like to call us for advice, you do not have to tell us who you are, and we will not call you back unless you wish.

All contact and processing information is confidential. We’re not obligated to tell your GP. The decision you make about your abortion care will be between you and our teams.

If you provide us with information by phone or online, suggesting that you or someone else is at serious risk of immediate harm, we will ask you to contact services that can help. There are some things we think are too important to keep between you and us, and we’ll talk to you about whether other people need to know what’s going on.

In some cases where a child or vulnerable adult may be at risk of harm, we have a duty to protect them by sharing information with appropriate agencies. In most cases, the parent or guardian of the child or vulnerable adult will be informed in advance, unless this is an additional risk to them.

DataProtection

We are committed to protecting your privacy. We are legally responsible for ensuring that all personal, confidential and confidential information we hold and use is done legally. This covers information we collect directly from you or information we may receive from other individuals or organizations.

The Aragon Medical Center reservation and advice line does not use the call screen and calls are not tracked. Calls to our advice line can be recorded for training purposes, and calls are played back in the event of a complaint.

Can I have other tests on the day of my abortion?

If you are having a Social Security-funded abortion, we may offer you some tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We’ll walk you through these tests, how you’ll get your results, and we’ll answer any questions you may have.

You may be offered proof to:

  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhea
  • Hiv
  • Syphilis

If we offer you these tests, we strongly recommend that you use them as a precaution. Chlamydia, in particular, is the most common STI in Spain and often has no symptoms. More information about chlamydia and other STIs will also be available at our clinics or centers.

We will also perform blood tests and monitor your pulse during the health evaluation part of your treatment.

Read more about what to expect during your appointment

What do I do if my religion or family prohibits abortion?

The decision on whether to continue or terminate your pregnancy is yours. This may not be the same decision your partner, friends, or family would make.

We believe that no one should be judged for having an abortion, although we understand that there may still be some stigma associated with abortion within religious communities, or of their peers or relatives who have religious opinions.

If you can’t talk to friends or family about your decision, you can talk to a CMA counselor, your family doctor, or a contraception and sexual health clinic. If you don’t want to talk to your family doctor, that’s fine too. You can call us 93 452 99 30 at any time to discuss your options.

They’re pressuring me to have an abortion, what should I do?

The decision on whether to continue or terminate your pregnancy is yours. This may not be the same decision your partner, friends, or family would make.

If you feel you are being pressured to have an abortion, let us know. We will not provide treatment unless you are sure of your decision. As part of an abortion appointment, you will have a private consultation before treatment, away from anyone who has accompanied you to the clinic. You can talk to our team privately and let them know what you are experiencing.

You may feel unable to talk to people closest to you, or you may be concerned about not receiving impartial support from them. This is where counseling can really help. CMA counselors are highly trained and qualified, and offer attentive, prejudice-free support. If you would like to arrange advice, you can call us at any time at 93 452 99 30 (open 24 hours) to book an appointment.

Will having an abortion increase my risk of developing breast cancer?

No, having an abortion won’t increase your risk of developing breast cancer. The World Health Organization* has published data showing that there is no link between abortion and breast cancer and that there is no increased risk.

* World Health Organization (2012), Safe abortion: technical and political guidance for health systems (second edition), p.49. Available in: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/70914/1/9789241548434_eng.pdf

Will having an abortion make it difficult for me to get pregnant in the future?

It will be possible to become pregnant again almost immediately after an abortion. If you don’t want to get pregnant, it’s important to start using birth control right away to protect yourself. We can provide you with information and advice on contraception options, andwe can provide you with the method chosen during your appointment.

Does an embryo or fetus feel pain during an abortion?

Medical evidence suggests that the fetus may not feel pain before 24 weeks gestation, as the nervous system is not yet fully developed*.

* Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (2010), Fetal Awareness: Review of Research and Recommendations for Practice. Available in: https://www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/guidelines/rcogfetalawarenesswpr0610.pdf

Am I eligible for a medication abortion?

At Aragon Medical Center, medication abortion is available up to 9 weeks + 6 days pregnant.

For most people who have a medication abortion, it’s a very safe procedure. However, not everyone is fit for a medical abortion and may be offered a surgical abortion.

We will calculate your pregnancy (how many weeks of pregnancy you have) and make a complete medical history during your appointment, and we may perform some tests to ensure your safety.

Is pharmacological abortion the same as the “morning-after pill”?

No, pharmacological abortion (or the ‘abortion pill’ as it is sometimes called) is not the same as the ‘next day’s pill’.

The “end of day”isanemergency contraceptive that can be taken up to 96 hours (5 days) after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. It is a progesterone-only hormone pill and works by delaying the release of an egg from an ovary, thus preventing pregnancy. There’s only one pill to take.

A medication abortion involves taking two different types of medications, mifepristone and misoprostol, at different times to terminate an existing pregnancy. In CMA you can use this abortion method up to 9 weeks + 6 days of pregnancy.

Learn more about medication abortion. Learn more about emergency contraception.

Does medication abortion have any side effects?

After a medication abortion, it is completely normal to experience some cramps and bleeding. Some women may also experience:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever/chills, temporary hot flashes or sweats.

If you are sick within an hour after taking the first pill, you will need to take another one to make it effective. You should let us know as soon as possible if you have been sick after taking the tablet.

The onset of these symptoms can occur shortly after taking the drug, but most women recover quickly, usually within 1-2 days. Plan your trip home from our clinic or center in advance, especially if you’re traveling long distances. We strongly recommend that you do not use public transportation and that someone travel with you.

Can I buy abortion pills online and take them at home?

You should only take medications for medication abortion if they have been prescribed by a qualified health care professional. Do not buy so-called ‘abortion pills’ online; may not be adequate and may put your health at risk. If you have already ordered pills online, we recommend that you call us before taking them; you can contact us 24 hours a day at 934529930.

Remember that in the vast majority of cases, if you are from the UK, you can receive safe, confidential and Social Security-funded abortion treatment at one of our CMA clinics.

If you live abroad or do not qualify for Social Security-funded treatment, you can also access our services privately.

How will I take the abortion pills with medication?

Medical treatment for abortion involves taking two different types of medication.

The first medication is the mifepristone pill and is swallowed with water. Most people can continue with their daily routine as normal after taking mifepristone, although you may experience some bleeding and pain similar to the start of your period. Do what feels comfortable for you at this time, and if you are uncomfortable you can take paracetamol and ibuprofen.

You may feel sick and occasionally some people vomit. If you are sick within 1 hour of taking the first pill, you will need to take another mifepristone tablet for it to be effective. Let us know as soon as possible if you become ill soon after taking the tablet. We have nurses available to speak to you on the telephone 24 hours a day, just call our aftercare line on 93 452 99 30.

Miscarriage is unlikely to start after taking mifepristone alone, but if you think you have had a miscarriage between appointments, let us know. It is important that you still attend your second appointment.

If you are taking the second medication (misoprostol) at home and you think you have miscarried before taking it, call our aftercare line on 93 452 99 30.

The second medication is misoprostol. There are three different ways to take misoprostol; this depends on the time between taking the mifepristone and the misoprostol medication.

At theclinic: Misoprostol taken at the same time as mifepristone: you will be asked to insert 4 misoprostol pills into your vagina. You will also be given a pain medication and an anti-sickness pill. You may also be given some antibiotics to prevent infection. All of these can be swallowed with water. If the tablets come out before you start bleeding, you can reinsert them or call our aftercare line on 93 452 99 30 for instructions on what to do. The tablets may fall out of the vagina when you start to bleed. If the tablets fall out at this point, do not worry. In most cases, enough medicine will have been absorbed.

At theclinic: Misoprostol taken 24, 48 or 72 hoursafter mifepristone: When you return to the clinic, you will receive 4 misoprostol tablets. There are two ways to use the misoprostol medication. The first way is to dissolve the tablets in the mouth between the cheek and gums. The second way is to insert the tablets into your vagina. You may be given some antibiotics to prevent infection and some pain medication.

At Home – Misoprostol taken 24 – 48 hoursafter taking mifepristone: If you are eligible for home use of misoprostol, you will take the misoprostol tablets home. You may also be given some antibiotics to prevent infection that can be swallowed with water. You can choose how you would like to use misoprostol tablets at home. You can dissolve the tablets in your mouth between your cheek and gums or insert the tablets into your vagina. Misoprostol tablets should be taken 24-48 hours after taking mifepristone in the clinic. Do not worry if you take them a few hours before or after this window; the tablets will probably work. If more than 72 hours have passed and you still have not taken the misoprostol tablets, call our aftercare line at 93 452 99 30 as you may need to repeat the treatment.

Please note that not all of our centers and clinics currently offer home use of misoprostol.

Make sure you have some pain relief medication (paracetamol, ibuprofen or codeine) at home before using misoprostol. We recommend taking some pain relief tablets 10 minutes before taking misoprostol tablets. Some people should avoid using ibuprofen and others should use it with caution.

Do not take aspirin as it may increase bleeding

Read our medical abortion page for more details about the procedure.

What will happen to me during a surgical abortion?

The procedure for a surgical abortion may differ depending on how many weeks you have been pregnant. However, no matter how far along you are in your pregnancy, surgical abortion is a very safe and quick procedure.

Prior to your treatment, our receptionist will review your notes to make sure all the details are complete. If you have not already had an ultrasound or blood work done, this will be completed prior to your admission for treatment, if applicable.

Most people who miscarry with CMA will be able to receive NHS funded treatment, however, if you are not eligible for this, we will pay for your treatment prior to your admission. Unfortunately, we will not be able to proceed with treatment without payment; please read our fees page to see the cost of each procedure and the types of payment we accept.

Our doctors will review your notes and make sure you are medically fit for the procedure, and then once everything is ready for you, you will be taken to the pre-treatment waiting room. If you have any questions or need information about what happens to your pregnancy after the abortion, one of our nurses will be available to answer them.

Depending on how many weeks pregnant you are, you will receive one of the following types of procedures. This will be explained to you during your appointment, where you will have the opportunity to ask any other questions you may have:

Before 12 weeks of pregnancy

The pregnancy is removed from the uterus by vacuum aspiration (this involves a suction method), which is used to remove the pregnancy through the cervix (neck of the womb) and vagina.

This is a very quick and simple 5 to 10 minute procedure.

If you are less than 10 weeks pregnant, you may choose not to receive any anesthesia. General anesthesia is not needed before 12 weeks of pregnancy, but we can offer sedation.

12-18 weeks + 6 daysí6 days of pregnancy

In this range of gestation, we may need to dilate (gently open) the cervix. A medication is placed in the mouth between the cheek and gums or placed in the vagina to dissolve. This causes the cervix to dilate (gently open) for a few hours. You will wait in the center during this time.

Between 12 and 14 weeks gestation, a suction method is used to remove the pregnancy through the cervix and vagina. This procedure is done under short-acting sedation.

Between 14 and 18 weeks gestation, specialized thin instruments will be used to dilate (gently open) the cervix and remove the pregnancy. This procedure is called dilation and evacuation (D&E). It is done under general anesthesia. The procedure takes 10-15 minutes, but you will be in the center for half a day.

In very rare cases, the medications used for cervical preparation may cause the pregnancy to be expelled. If at any time you begin to experience severe cramping, heavy bleeding, or the need to push, let one of our team members know immediately.

19 – 22 weeks + 6 daysídays of pregnancy

In this gestational range, treatment is done in two separate stages. You will be asked to arrive at the center early in the morning for the first stage, which involves preparation of the cervix (neck of the uterus). A medication is placed in the cervix at the top of the vagina to cause the cervix to dilate (gently open) for 4 to 6 hours. You will wait in the center during this time.

To complete the procedure, the second stage will take place later that day. You will be given general anesthesia. The cervix is opened further and the pregnancy is removed through the cervix and vagina using specialized thin instruments and suction. This procedure is called dilation and evacuation (D&E).

The procedure takes 10-20 minutes, but you will be in the center all day.

In very rare cases, the medications used for cervical preparation may cause the pregnancy to be expelled. If at any time you begin to experience severe cramping, heavy bleeding, or the need to push, let one of our team members know immediately.

If you have made an appointment to have a surgical abortion, read ‘How should I prepare for my abortion? For more information.

How long will it take to recover from a surgical abortion?

Most women will recover from a surgical abortion very quickly and can return to work in a few days. After surgical treatment of abortion, it is normal to experience:

  • Bleeding: This may start immediately or up to 72 hours after the procedure. Bleeding may be more intense than a normal period, with small clots, but it is not a pear it can last up to 1-2 weeks.
  • Pain: Cramp pain is normal after the procedure as the uterus contracts to its normal size. Cramps can be constant or intermittent, and it is not unusual to continue cramping for the first 2 weeks after treatment.

If you have had a procedure that uses cervical preparation medications, you may experience side effects such as:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Chills or mild fever.
  • Colic-type pain
  • Bleeding: If you start bleeding after cervical preparation, tell one of our nurses right away so we can evaluate it.

We’ll give you advice on pain relief, such as acetaminophen or codeine. These pain medications will not interfere with any abortion medications, however, do not take aspirin as it may increase bleeding. Do not take ibuprofen until 12 to 18 hours after your procedure.

If you have any concerns about any pain or symptoms you experience after your abortion, you can call our post-934529930 care line at any time, day or night, to speak with a nurse.

For tips on recovery after an abortion, read our Post Abortion Care page.

Does surgical abortion hurt?

We will do our best to make sure you feel comfortable before, during and after your procedure.

If you have general anesthesia, you will not feel pain during the surgical part of the procedure, as you will be completely asleep. If you are more than 14 weeks pregnant, you may be given some medications to help dilate your cervix and this can cause some cramps.

If you have sedation, you may feel some discomfort and pain in your lower abdomen as your uterus (womb) contracts at the end of the procedure. If you have sedation, you will also be given a pain reliever.

If you don’t have anesthesia, you’re likely to experience some pain, but you won’t have the side effects of medications used for sedation. If you do not have sedation or general anesthesia, you can take 400 mg of ibuprofen and/or 1 gram of acetaminophen one hour before your appointment. Tell the nurse upon arrival of any medicines you have taken. Do not take aspirin as this may increase bleeding.

For 2 weeks after the procedure, you may experience constant or intermittent cramping pain in your abdomen as your uterus contracts and returns to its normal size. We’ll give you pain relief tips, such as acetaminophen, codeine, or ibuprofen. These pain medications will not interfere with any abortion medications.

If you are concerned about the level of pain you are experiencing, or if your pain is not controlled with pain relievers, call our 24-hour back-care line at 934529930, go to an A&E department or consult your family doctor.

Do I need an anesthetic with a surgical abortion?

We offer three anesthesia options during the surgical abortion procedure. During your consultation, we can discuss which option would be recommended, given your unique circumstances and medical history.

No anesthesia

This is appropriate for clients who are less than 10 weeks pregnant, especially if you have delivered vaginally in the past. You may take ibuprofen and acetaminophen prior to the procedure. Some people should avoid using ibuprofen and others should use it with caution. Do not take aspirin because it may increase bleeding. You will be in the treatment room for about 10 minutes. The procedure is uncomfortable, but usually only lasts a short time. You will feel severe cramping pains that will pass when the procedure is over. Our nurses will stay with you and keep you distracted. We will give you a heating pad and other pain relief afterwards.

Benefits of no anesthesia include:

  • Avoid the risks associated with anesthesia.
  • Be able to eat and drink before the procedure.
  • Faster recovery time
  • Be able to drive home.

Sedationóanesthesia or general anesthesia

With both types of anesthesia, you are not likely to remember the procedure. Both involve giving the same types of medicines through a needle or cannula (small tube) into a vein, usually on the back of the hand. The amount of medication given is unique to each person’s needs. Our anesthesiologist will be with you at all times during this procedure.

If you have anesthesia, you will need to fast before your appointment. This means no food or drink for a few hours in preparation. Read “How should I prepare for my abortion” for details on when you should stop eating and what you can drink before your appointment.

Sedation anesthesia (usually for less than 14 weeks gestation): You are given a lower dose of medication, resulting in severe drowsiness or unconsciousness for the short duration of the procedure and a quicker recovery. You will maintain control over your breathing and reflexes, but you may not remember the procedure.

General anesthesia (usually for less than 22 weeks and 6days gestation)-You will be given a higher dose of medicine, resulting in a more profound loss of consciousness for a longer time. It will take a little longer for you to recover. You may not have control over your breathing and reflexes, so we may give you oxygen and help you breathe through a mask or a plastic tube in your throat. Anesthetic risks and complications (below) increase as the level of anesthesia increases.

Side effects of anesthesiaéside effects of anesthesia

  • Drowsiness-You should not drive, sign important documents (such as contracts), or operate heavy machinery for 24 hours after the procedure. Some auto insurance policies specify that you should not drive for 48 hours after an anesthesia procedure, so check with your insurance provider.
  • Nausea and vomiting-Inform your doctor or nurse if you feel nauseous, as we can give you medication to help.
  • Heightened emotions – For some clients, this means that they may feel a variety of emotions after treatment. A nurse will be available to help and this feeling usually passes after 10-20 minutes.
  • Bruising: You may develop some bruising and soreness when the cannula has been inserted into the vein. The bruising usually resolves within a week.
  • Pain: You may experience a cold or aching sensation in the vein during the anesthetic injection. This resolves quickly and is not harmful. Sometimes you may feel pain in the vein after the procedure, which subsides after a few hours.

Possible Complications and Risks of Anesthesia

  • Adverse drug reaction-Reactions to anesthesia medications are rare. They can range from mild (rash) to severe (anaphylaxis). The anesthesiologist will evaluate and treat any adverse drug reaction.
  • Airway Difficulty: Spasm of the airway or vomiting during the procedure are rare complications. The anesthesiologist will monitor you during the procedure and treat any complications if they occur. However, if the anesthesiologist is concerned that vomit has entered the lungs, you will be transferred to a hospital service.
  • Prolonged recovery: Most clients are fully awake, relatively comfortable and almost back to themselves within 30-60 minutes after waking up. On rare occasions, due to dehydration, recreational drug use, or other co-existing health problems, it may take longer to return to normal. We will not discharge you from our care until we are certain that you have fully recovered, are able to walk independently, and that your pain is well controlled. If you do not begin to feel like yourself within a normal period of time, or if you have persistent pain, this may be a sign that you need more attention to recover and we may transfer you to a more advanced care setting, such as a hospital.
  • Difficulty or failure to obtain intravenous (IV) access: This is where the anesthesiologist has difficulty inserting the needle/cannula into the vein. It can be affected by the size and depth of the veins or dehydration. This is rare, but if it happens, it may mean that your treatment cannot continue today.

Keep in mind that anesthesia will not be right for everyone. During your consultation, we will discuss your medical history to ensure that the option is safe for you. We will take further advice as necessary to ensure that you are offered the safest option.

What are the side effects of a surgical abortion?

Side effects of surgical abortion are common, but short-lived. Any side effects you experience will depend on your procedure and anesthetic choice, and may include:

  • Bleeding: This may start immediately or up to 72 hours after the procedure. Bleeding may be more intense than a normal period, with small clots, but it is not a pear it can last up to 1-2 weeks.
  • Pain: Cramp pain is normal after the procedure as the uterus contracts to its normal size.

Side effects of cervical preparation medication (if necessary):

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Chills or mild fever.
  • Colic-type pain
  • Bleeding: If you start bleeding after cervical preparation, tell one of our nurses right away so we can evaluate it.

If you have any concerns about any pain or symptoms you experience after your abortion, you can call our post-93 452 99 30 care line at any time, day or night, to speak with a nurse.

What are the possible complications and risks of surgical abortion?

Surgical abortion is a very safe procedure (many times safer than childbirth), but as with any medical procedure, it is not without potential complications or risks:

Infection: rare (affects less than 1 in 100 people)

It can be reduced by following our aftercare tips. If an infection is left untreated, it can lead to serious problems and infertility. If you have symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), such as unusual vaginal discharge, fever, or lower abdominal pain and discomfort, you should seek urgent medical attention. See your family doctor or visit your Primary Care Center.

Retained Tissue (retained products of conception): commonretained tissue (retained products of conception): commonúretained tissue (retained products of conception): common (affects fewer than 5 out of 100 people)

This is where part of the pregnancy is not removed from the uterus, or a blood clot forms in the uterus after the procedure. Retained tissue, products, or clots will sometimes pass spontaneously, or may require additional treatment (medication or another surgical procedure similar to a surgical abortion).

Heavy bleeding (hemorrhage): rare (affects 1-4 in 1000 people)

This may happen during the procedure, immediately after, or up to 10 days after you have returned home. It may be associated with having had previous pregnancies, previous cesarean sections, and older age.

Perforation of the úperforation of the uterus: rare (affects fewer than 5 in 1000 people)

This is the risk that the instruments will puncture or rupture the uterus, bladder, or bowel. The risk increases at higher gestations. If we find this has happened, we will transfer you to a hospital.

Cervical damage: rare (affects less than 5 in 1000 people)cervical damage: rare (1 in 100 people)

This may happen during the surgical procedure. If this happens, the surgeon will make a decision about whether to repair the damage or transfer you to an NHS hospital.

Treatment failure (continuation of pregnancy)-rare (1 in 100 people)

This means that the pregnancy continues to develop, even after the procedure. Further treatment, such as medical (misoprostol) or surgical treatment, will be discussed. Transfer to another service can also be made if the pregnancy continues. We recommend a pregnancy test 3 weeks after treatment (any earlier test is not reliable).

Thrombosis (coáthrombosis (blood clots in the legs or lungs)

This is a risk of being pregnant and a risk of any surgery. There is also a risk of thrombosis with air travel. The risk increases with higher gestation.

Serious complications have warning signs. If you experience any of the symptoms below, call us immediately:

  • Abdominal pain or discomfort that is not relieved by pain relievers or a tea pad
  • Vaginal discharge that smells unpleasant.
  • Feeling hot and chilly with a high temperature of 38° C or more
  • Feeling generally unwell.
  • Very heavy bleeding that soaks more than 2 pads (suitable for heavy flow) per hour.
  • If you bleed a lot during or immediately after your treatment, we can often manage this on site, but may transfer you to a hospital.

Sepsis can be caused by an infection anywhere in the body. Sepsis after an abortion is rare, but very serious. The symptoms of sepsis can be like having the flu at first. If you develop any of the following signs, it is important to seek urgent medical advice:

  • Feeling dizzy or faint.
  • Confusion
  • Slurred speech
  • Extreme chills
  • Severe muscle pain
  • Being unable to urinate
  • Severe dyspnea
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Cool, clammy, and pale or blotchy skin.

If you have any concerns about any pain or symptoms you experience after your abortion, you can call our aftercare line on 93 452 99 30 at any time, day or night, to speak to a nurse.

What will happen to fetal tissue after a surgical abortion?

If you do not have any special requests, we always make sure that all fetal tissue is handled and disposed of in a respectful and professional manner. We also follow all relevant legislation in Spain, including the Human Tissues Act, which has a clinical framework for the storage and removal of fetal tissue.

I’m bleeding after my medication abortion, what should I do?

It is perfectly normal to experience some bleeding after a surgical abortion. This can start immediately or up to 72 hours after your procedure, and can last up to 1-2 weeks.

Bleeding may be more intense than a normal period, with small clots, but it’s not a period. Do not take aspirin during this time as it may increase your bleeding. If you bleed a lot during or immediately after your treatment, we can often handle this on site, but we can transfer you to a hospital.

Some women may experience bleeding (this is rare and affects about 1-4 out of 1000 women), but it can occur during the procedure, immediately after or up to 10 days after they have returned home. It can be associated with previous pregnancies, previous C-sections and older age.

If you find that you are experiencing heavy bleeding that soaks more than 2 sanitary towels (suitable for heavy flow) per hour, call us right away. You can contact us on our dedicated back care line: 934529930 – open 24 hours a day.

Read more about surgical abortion

I’m in pain after my medication abortion. What should I do?

It is perfectly normal to experience some pain after a medication abortion. You are likely to experience severe cramps, usually stronger than an intense period, immediately afterwards, and this can last a few hours. Cramps will usually decrease over the course of 1-2 days after taking the second set of tablets, but occasionally this can take up to 2 weeks.

Each person is different and will experience different levels of pain. We recommend the following tips to help deal with any pain:

  • Acetaminophen, codeine, and ibuprofen are pain relievers that won’t interfere with the abortion medication. We’ll give you tips on when to take these tablets. Do not take aspirin as it may increase bleeding.
  • Apply a thermal pad or bottle of hot water (tibia) wrapped in a towel or blanket to the lower abdomen.
  • Wear comfortable, loose clothes, get comfortable and try to relax at home. We recommend that you delay your return to work up to 1-2 days after your treatment.

If you have abdominal pain or discomfort that is not relieved by pain relief medications or a thermal pad, you can call our post-93 452 99 30 care line at any time, day or night, to speak with a nurse.

Read more about medication abortion.

I’m in pain after my medication abortion. What should I do?

It is perfectly normal to experience constant or intermittent cramps after a surgical abortion. It is not unusual to continue cramping for the first 2 weeks after treatment.

Each person is different and will experience different levels of pain. We recommend the following tips to help deal with any pain:

  • Acetaminophen, codeine, and ibuprofen are pain relievers that won’t interfere with the abortion medication. We’ll give you tips on when to take these tablets. Do not take aspirin as it may increase bleeding. Do not take ibuprofen until 12 to 18 hours after your procedure.
  • Apply a thermal pad or bottle of hot water (tibia) wrapped in a towel or blanket to the lower abdomen.
  • Wear comfortable, loose clothes, get comfortable and try to relax at home. We recommend that you delay your return to work up to 1-2 days after your treatment.

If you have abdominal pain or discomfort that is not relieved by pain relief medications or a thermal pad, you can call our post-934529930 care line at any time, day or night, to speak with a nurse.

Read more about surgical abortion

If I get antibiotics after my abortion, how should I take them?

After your abortion procedure, we can give you some antibiotics. The nurse will assess your need for additional protection against infection.

You may be given:

  • Metronidazole: 2 tablets to take at the clinic; And
  • Azithromycin: 4 tablets to take at home.

Sometimes, we can give you different antibiotics depending on which area of SS you are or if you have an allergy to the medications we use.

The four tablets of azithromycin (1 gram each) should all be taken at the same time at the night of their treatment. They can be taken one hour before a meal or 2 hours later. However, if you feel sick or unwell after treatment, you can leave it until the next day. It is advisable not to take antibiotics within an hour of bedtime.

Here are some common questions and answers about antibiotics:

WhatshouldI do if I forgotto take my antibiotics?

Take them the next morning or within 24 hours.

I’ve been sick aftertakingantibiotics; will Ihave to take them again?

Antibiotics are prescribed only as a precautionary measure. However, they also treat chlamydia. If you have tested positive for chlamydia, you should see your family doctor as soon as possible for more antibiotics. You should also be careful to follow subsequent care tips on how to minimize the risk of infection.

Can I breastfeed while taking the antibiotics I was prescribed?

We recommend that you do not breastfeed for 48 hours after taking the antibiotics Azithromycin and Metrodazole. If you can, we recommend that you remove some milk before attending the clinic to be seen until you can breastfeed again.

Read the health guide on how to extract and store breast milk

Can I drink alcohol while taking antibiotics?

You should not drink alcohol while taking your antibiotics or for 48 hours after finishing your course.

I have diarrhea and stomach cramps after takingthe antibiotics, is this normal?

Diarrhoea is a common side effect of azithromycin antibiotics and can last a couple of days.

Antibiotics don’t relieve my pain

Antibiotics will not relieve any pain you may be experiencing; you’ll need to take painkillers for this. You can take painkillers and antibiotics at the same time, and we can advise you on pain relievers that don’t interfere with any abortion medications.

If you have further questions about antibiotics or after-care after your abortion, call us at 934529930. Our lines are open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Do I have an infection after my abortion?

It is quite rare to get an infection after an abortion; only about 1 in 100 women will get one. You can further reduce your risk by following our post-care tips. After your abortion procedure, we may prescribe antibiotics to help you minimize your risk of infection.

Read more about taking antibiotics after an abortion

If you think you have an infection, it is important that you seek urgent medical attention as soon as possible by contacting your family doctor or visiting your Primary Care Center. If an infection is not treated, it can cause more serious problems.

Symptoms of an infection include:

  • Abdominal pain or discomfort that is not relieved with pain-relieving medications or a tea pad
  • Vaginal discharge that smells unpleasant.
  • Feeling of heat and chills with a high temperature of 38oC or more
  • It generally feels bad.

If you have any concerns or need help taking your antibiotics (if they have been given), call our dedicated post-934529930 care line. The lines are open 24 hours a day.

Should I take a pregnancy test after my abortion?

After a medical abortion, wewill do a pregnancy test to take home and confirm that the pregnancy has passed. We ask that you wait 3 weeks after your abortion before taking the pregnancy test. This is because some pregnancy hormones may be present up to 3 weeks after abortion, which can give a false positive result.

If the pregnancy test is positive, call our post-934529930 care line right away. Our advisors can help you book an appointment for another ultrasound and additional treatment if needed.

It is rare for women to become pregnant after a surgical abortion; treatment failure only affects about 1 in 100 women. However, if you are concerned that you may still be pregnant, we also recommend a pregnancy test 3 weeks after treatment and contact us if you get a positive result.

What contraception can I use after an abortion?

It is possible to become pregnant almost immediately after an abortion, and as part of your post-abortion care, you should avoid having sex for two weeks after treatment.

If you do not wish to become pregnant, we recommend that you have contraceptives ready for after treatment. We can help you find a method that fits your body and lifestyle: you can talk to us about contraception, either over the phone or in a face-to-face consultation during your appointment.

Please contact us at 934529930 to arrange a contraception consultation. The lines are open 24 hours a day.

Types of contraceptives

Contraceptive methods can be short-acting, long-acting, or permanent. All have their different advantages and disadvantages, and not all methods will suit everyone. They also have different levels of effectiveness. We can talk to you about any of these methods if you want to explore them further, and we can provide you with more information.

Many birth control methods can begin the same day after your abortion. This means you can leave your appointment knowing you’re protected right away. If you are not sure which method you would like to use in the long term, we can provide you with a short-term method. You can then make an appointment with your family doctor or local family planning service when you’re ready for more birth control services.

Short-acting contraception includes:

  • External condoms (male)
  • Internal condoms (female)
  • Combined pill
  • Progestogen pill alone (POP or ‘mini pill’)
  • Vaginal ring
  • Diaphragm or cervical cap
  • Contraceptive patch

Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) includes:

  • Contraceptive implant
  • Intrauterine System (SIU): also known as a coil
  • Intrauterine device (IUD): also known as copper coil
  • Contraceptive injection

Permanent contraception includes:

  • Vasectomy: also known as male sterilization
  • Female sterilization (not offered by CMA)

Visit our contraception page to read about each of these methods in more detail

How can I prevent a pregnancy?

Using birth control when having sex is always the best way to prevent pregnancy: you can choose from a variety of long- and short-term methods. If you have had unprotected sex or your contraception has failed (for example, you have forgotten to take a birth control pill or condom division), emergency contraception can also prevent pregnancy.

Emergency contraception is often referred to as the “doctorofthe dayafter” when it can actually beused withinfivedaysof having had unprotected sexReadmore aboutthe different types of contraception. Read more about the difference between the “morning-after pill” and the “abortion pill”

Where can I get emergency contraception?

You can get emergency contraceptives for free at:

  • Caps
  • NHS no-appointment centres
  • Sexual health clinics.
  • Pharmacies
  • Some hospital departments of gynecology
  • CJAS Services (for children under 25 years old)

Brook offers free and confidential relationships and youth sexual health services, including birth control, STI testing and treatment, pregnancy testing and options, counseling and online counseling and counseling. For more information and to find your local service, visit the CEJAS website.

What are the symptoms of pregnancy?

If you have had unprotected sex or your contraception has failed, you may be pregnant. Signs and symptoms of pregnancy vary and may include:

  • Late or lost period.
  • Swelling or tenderness of the breasts.
  • More frequent trips to the bath
  • Nausea or vomiting (morning sickness can happen at any time of the day).
  • Change in appetite.
  • Tiredness

If you’ve had unprotected sex in the last five days and don’t want to be pregnant, you can use emergency contraceptives such as “the morning-after pill” or the IUD to make sure your pregnancy doesn’t continue.

It is importantto know thedifference betweenthe “endoftheday” andthe “abortiveldora” : read more in this link.

If you have had unprotected sex more than fivedays ago, it is important to have apregnancy test after approximately three weeks, if your period is late, or if you have abnormal bleeding. Different home pregnancy tests may have different sensitivities, so if you have any doubts that you are pregnant, even when the test is negative, you should repeat the test a week later or make an appointment with your family doctor or CMA.

For more information, call our 24-hour counseling line at 934529930.

What is an ectopic pregnancy?

An ectopic pregnancy is when a pregnancy develops outside the uterus (or uterus). When childbirth adheres to the wrong place, pregnancy cannot survive. An ectopic pregnancy is estimated to occur in 1 in 150 pregnancies.

If the pregnancy was not visible on the ultrasound, you may have been asked to return within a week or so for another scan. Although you may have a low risk of ectopic pregnancy, it’s important to know the following symptoms.

  • Vaginal bleeding or aqueous marbled discharge
  • Pain at the tip of his shoulder.
  • Low abdominal pain on one side.
  • Discomfort when urinating or defecating.

These symptoms are not necessarily a sign of a serious problem, but call our nurses at our 24-hour back-to-back hotline: 934529930

If you have any combinations of the following symptoms, seek medical attention right away:

  • Acute, sudden and severe pain in the abdomen.
  • Feeling dizzy or fainting.
  • Feeling sick
  • Looking very pale

Call 601 or go to your nearest CAPS

How many weeks of pregnancy do I have?

If you’ve had a positive pregnancy test, we can help you figure out how many weeks of pregnancy you may have (your gestation). Just call us at 934529930 and tellus on the first day of your last period.

If you’ve had a positive pregnancy test and are thinking about having an abortion, it’s important to know how many weeks of pregnancy you have, as this can affect your options. Medication abortion (the abortion pill), for example, is only available in CMA for up to 9 weeks and 3 days gestation.

If you had a positive pregnancy result and it wasn’t planned, read more about your options.

Remember, our friendly team is here to help you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, just call us to speak with one of our advisors.

How can I evaluate if I am pregnant?

Home pregnancy test kits are available at pharmacies and supermarkets. Your local family doctor, family planning clinic, specialized youth clinics such as CJAS, and some pharmacies may also provide free pregnancy tests.

After a positive pregnancy test result, you can find out your gestation (how many weeks you are pregnant) by visiting a family doctor or sexual health clinic. If you know the date of the first day of your last menstrual period, we can help you resolve your gestation.

If you have irregular periods, no periods, or if the stage of pregnancy is unclear, gestation can be verified with an ultrasound.

The number of weeks you’ve been pregnant can affect available abortion options, so it’s important to find out.

What is the “morning after pill”?

Using birth control when having sex is always the best way to prevent pregnancy: you can choose from a variety of long- and short-term methods. If you have had unprotected sex or your contraception has failed (for example, you have forgotten to take a birth control pill or condom division), emergency contraception can also prevent pregnancy.

Emergency contraception is often referred to as the “morning-after pill,” but it can actually be used within five days of unprotected sex, and works by preventing or delaying ovulation.

It is important to know thatifyou take theday’sgroundafterovulation, it is unlikely to be effective. Read more about emergency contraception.

<h3>¿Cuál es la forma más eficaz de método anticonceptivo de emergencia?</h3>

There are 3 types of emergency contraception:

  • Levonorgestrel EmergencyContraceptive Epilceptive (LNG), also known as Levonelle: it can be taken within 96 hours (four days) of unprotected sex, however, it is most effective within the first 72 hours (three days).
  • the emergencycontraceptive epilceptive Ulipristal Acetate (UPA) also known as Ellaone: it can be taken within 120 hours (five days) of unprotected sex
  • The intrauterine device (IUD or coil): this is the most effective emergency contraceptionand can be installed up to 120 hours or 5 days after sex without protection A copper coil isasmall T-shaped copper device that is placed in a woman’s uterus and can provide contraceptive protection for up to ten years. One of the benefits of using the IUD is that, once installed, you can choose to continue using it as your ongoing method of contraception. The mostlong-acting reversible contraceptives(LARCs) offer excellent protection against pregnancy, ranging from three months to ten years. They’re ideal if you know you don’t want to have kids for a while.

Because the next day’s pill is unlikely to be effective when taken after ovulation, the most effective formofemergency contraception is the intrauterine device (IUD), alsoknownas the coil.

The IUD can beinserted up to5 days afterunprotected sex,or up to 5 days after the time Earlieryou mayhave ovulated(releasedan egg), to prevent pregnancy. Readmore about emergencycontraceptives.

How does the IUD work as an emergency contraception?

The intrauterine device (IUD) is a small T-shaped copper and plastic device that a doctor or nurse places in your uterus (uterus). Release copper to prevent the egg from being implanted in the uterus or fertilized.

The IUD can beinserted up to5 days afterunprotected sex,or up to 5 days after the time Earlieryou mayhave ovulated(releasedan egg), to prevent pregnancy.

You can also choose to leave the IUD as a continuous method of contraception. The emergency IUD is the most effective method of emergency contraception: less than 1 % d in women using the IUD become pregnant.

Read moreabout the IUD as an emergency contraception.

What emergency method of contraception should I use?

The type of emergency anti-canceryou use depends on your preference and the risk of becoming pregnant. You can assess your risk of getting pregnant using a simple calculator.

Readmore about emergencycontraceptives.

Do I have to pay for the morning-after pill?

If you are 16 years of age or older, you can purchase the emergency birth control pill at most pharmacies, in person or online. You must be at least 16 years old to buy the morning-after pill online. The cost varies, but will be around 25 to 35 Euros. You will have to pay for the next day’s pill if you choose to buy online.

We recommend that you be evaluated by a health care professional before using emergency contraception.

If you wantthenextday’spage for future use

Some organizations may allow you to purchase the morning-after pill for future use. Check your options with your provider.

Read more about emergency contraception

Will it affect my sex life?

Having a vasectomy won’t affect your sex life.

After a vasectomy, the testes will still produce the hormone testosterone, which is the male sex hormone. Many couples say they enjoy sex more after a vasectomy. This is because they may choose to have sex more spontaneously, without worrying about an unwanted pregnancy.

Will I still be able to ejaculate?

Yes. Vasectomy does not affect the orgasm or appearance of your semen.

How should I prepare for my vasectomy?

Once you’ve booked an appointment for your vasectomy procedure, you can start preparing to make it as easy as possible.

  1. Organize trips

We’ll send you a map that shows you how to get to the center. If you are unsure about the instructions, have any questions or think you will be late for your appointment, please call us at 0345 300 0212.

It is important to arrange your return trip before coming to your appointment. You should not drive home after your procedure, or drive for 48 hours afterwards. We recommend that you do not use public transport, but you can use a taxi service. If you need to use public transportation, we strongly recommend that someone be with you when you travel in case you start to feel unwell.

  1. Whatto wear

It is important to wear tight cotton underwear on the day of your appointment and for a minimum of seven days afterwards: the tighter, the better. This is to support your scrotum, make you feel more comfortable and speed up the healing process. We recommend getting some that are 1 or 2 sizes smaller than normal and enough new pairs for your recovery. Tight underwear:

  • provides support to the testicles
  • helps reduce any pain
  • it’s more like
  • will help the recovery
  • reduces swelling of the testicles
  1. Pain relief.

You can relieve pain before your appointment to help manage any pain or discomfort. We recommend that you relieve pain before your procedure; We suggest you take acetaminophen (2 x 500 mg).

Do not take aspirin as this may increase the risk of bleeding. If you take aspirin for medical reasons, let us know so we can discuss this more thoroughly with you.

  1. Drug use

You shouldn’t have used any recreational drugs for at least 24 hours before your appointment. If you’ve taken recreational drugs, let us know. This may affect your treatment and your ability to consent.

  1. Drinking alcohol

We recommend that you do not drink alcohol 24 hours before your appointment. Alcohol can dilate blood vessels, which can lead to increased bleeding.

  1. Bayñarse

It’s a good idea to bathe or shower before leaving home on the day of your appointment. Do not shave or trim hair around the testicles.

How should I take care of the wound?

Since we just need to make a small puncture hole in the skin of the scrotum, your wound will be covered with a simple dressing. The dressing should be kept dry and in place for at least 48 hours wearing tight and supportive underwear during the day and night. This provides more support, can reduce pain and swelling, and will be more comfortable.

Avoid bathing or showering during this period. You will be provided with post-care information on your appointment in more detail.

How long will I have to leave work?

If you have a job that involves physical stress, we recommend that you take a couple of weeks off. Avoid lifting heavy objects or playing contact sports. We recommend that you recline as much as possible during your recovery.

When can I have sex after my vasectomy?

You can resume sexual activity when you feel comfortable, which for most men is about a week. We recommend that you take it easy the first time.

Remember: you should continue to use contraceptives until we have confirmed that your vasectomy has been successful.

Can I play sports after my vasectomy?

Avoid sports and physical exercise for at least 2 weeks after the procedure. This includes swimming and golf. Intense physical exercise and contact sports should be avoided for 4 weeks. Examples include rugby, football, squash, cycling, skiing and going to the gym.

You can judge your recovery by how quickly the wound heals and how quickly any inflammation or pain goes away. If in doubt, call us at 934529930 for advice.

How will I know if my vasectomy has been successful?

To make sure your vasectomy procedure has been successful, we need to test your semen in a lab. After your vasectomy procedure, you will be given a semen test kit, which comes with instructions and a return envelope.

After testing the sample, we will write to confirm that your vasectomy has been successful.

Until you receive confirmation, you should use another form of contraception to prevent pregnancy.

Can I reverse my vasectomy if I change my mind?

Vasectomy reversal is possible, but success is not guaranteed and depends heavily on how long it was done. It is much better to consider vasectomy as a permanent procedure.

What are the possible complications and risks of vasectomy?

A vasectomy is a very safe procedure. However, there are some possible complications or risks, such as any type of surgery. Remember that you can call us at 934529930, 24 hours a day, to talk to a nurse about tips for aftercare.

Early failure – (affects less than 1 in 100 people)

Treatment may not be successful. This will be collected during the semen test you have after your procedure. If this happens, we would recommend repeating the procedure and we will fix it for free.

Late failure– (affects1 in 2000 people)

This means that the tubes (deferential ducts) have rejoined over time. This can happen up to ten years after a vasectomy. This may happen, but it’s very rare. Unfortunately, there is no way to know that this is going to happen, and it would only be discovered with an unwanted pregnancy. For peace of mind, we can provide semen testing at any time after your vasectomy, for a small fee.

Infection

As with all surgical procedures, there is a risk of infection. The risk of infection can be minimized by making sure that the hands are washed before and after touching the wound site, and that the area stays clean and dry.

Find out how to take care of the wound

Bruises

In some cases, a small blood vessel may bleed inside the scrotum and may form a clot. They are usually small, but can sometimes cause severe swelling and discomfort. This can happen a few hours or a few days after treatment and can be the result of too much strenuous activity and heavy lifting. We recommend that you do not do any heavy work or physical activity for at least two weeks after your treatment.

Pain

A small number of men are known to have long-term or intermittent pain after a vasectomy. This has occurred in very few CMA vasectomies. If you have any concerns, please call our 24-hour counseling line.

Bleeding

The wound may bleed, but it can stop blood flow by pinching the skin firmly with clean hands around the wound for about five minutes. You can also find some blood in your semen after your first ejaculations; This is not unusual and there is only blood left of the procedure.

Prolonged bruising

Bruises usually don’t cause any more problems. The bruises will disappear over time.

Packages

You may feel a small lump at the site of the procedure on one or both sides. This may be due to tube healing.

Very rarely, sperm can leak from sealed tubes (deferential duct) and form a small lump, known as sperm granuloma, in the scrotum. These lumps are often not painful and can often be treated with anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen.

Some people should avoid using ibuprofen, and others should use it with caution. If you have any questions about using pain relief medications, talk to one of our nurses. If your lumps become too large or if you’re worried about the lumps, call us.

How confidential are CMA vasectomy services?

We are committed to protecting your privacy. If you would like to call us for advice, you do not have to tell us who you are, and we will not call you back unless you wish. All contact and processing information is confidential.

If you provide us with information by phone or online, suggesting that you or someone else is at serious risk of immediate harm, we will ask you to contact services that can help. There are some things we think are too important to keep between you and us, and we’ll talk to you about whether other people need to know what’s going on.

In some cases where a child or vulnerable adult may be at risk of harm, we have a duty to protect them by sharing information with appropriate agencies. In most cases, the parent or guardian of the child or vulnerable adult will be informed in advance, unless this is an additional risk to them.

DataProtection

We are committed to protecting your privacy. We are legally responsible for ensuring that all personal, confidential and confidential information we hold and use is done legally. This covers information we collect directly from you or information we may receive from other individuals or organizations.

The CMA booking and advice line does not use the call screen and calls are not tracked. Calls to our advice line can be recorded for training purposes, and calls are played back in the event of a complaint.

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